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 Duncan park station 

INTRODUCTION

Duncan Park is a park along North Limestone and Fifth Street in downtown Lexington, Kentucky. In the 1790’s the park was an acquirement from William Morton who had built one of Lexington’s mansions around 1810. After the death of Morton, it was bought by Cassius Marcellus Clay. The building is located in the middle of the park where it now serves as a location for The Nest – a safe place for women and children. In addition to The Nest, there is a small bus stop the takes passengers northeast of N. Limestone route. There are also basketball courts 20 feet away from The Nest, but the amount of activity is lacking. The Martin Luther King Neighborhood Association has focused on improving Duncan Park since 2001 to revive it. Duncan Park’s current condition is not progressive even with the rising population density of that area.

Duncan Park is a park along North Limestone and Fifth Street in downtown Lexington, Kentucky. In the 1790’s the park was an acquirement from William Morton who had built one of Lexington’s mansions around 1810. After the death of Morton, it was bought by Cassius Marcellus Clay. The building is in the middle of the park where it now serves as a location for The Nest – a safe place for women and children. In addition to The Nest, there is a small bus stop the takes passengers northeast of N. Limestone route. There are also basketball courts 20 feet away from The Nest, but the amount of activity is lacking. The Martin Luther King Neighborhood Association has focused on improving Duncan Park since 2001 in an effort to revive it. Duncan Park’s current condition is not progressive even with the rising population density of that area.

The inspiration for the architectural moves of the bus station and other components originate from the historic posts already fabricated on the site nearly 150 years ago. These posts are monumental in a sense- their monolithic tone acts as the entrance to the building that sits on the hill in Duncan Park.

 

The problem is that these once monolithic structures are now nothing but background sculptures. What I have found in these monolithic objects is the intensely beautiful decaying and decomposition that they portray. The stone reveals itself, and grass seems to spurt out and grow along the objects – breaking away at the yellow concrete stucco.

 

When seeing this on the site I knew that in some way I had to bring back to life these objects and create a third one to create a trinity within the park. It resulted in the inspiration of the design of my bus station. My bus station would be this contemporary structure that is “stuck” on the third monolith form I produce. Through the designs there is a theme of playing with tectonics, and by playing with the overall form of my bus station, new pathways and structures were created for the rest of the site. After finding inspiration in the monolithic tone of the two objects already on the site, investigation in form was further pushed through an abstraction exercise. Through this process of drawing with four-dimensional qualities, the third monolithic structure that I propose would act as a structural component that would pause time and space – causing the forms around it to come to a tectonic form and stay still.​​